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rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

                                    rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

    rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

    rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

                                    rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth 

rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth 

rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

                                    rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

    rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

    rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

                                    rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

rare_earth rare_earth rare_earth

        rare_earth  

IN PRODUCTION 

CITIES

OF

SAND.unearthing the connections

podcast series.

kindly funded by ESRC 

and supported by LSE's

Department of Geography and Environment

 

 

 

SEEING THE CITY AS NATURE RE-CONSTITUTED, this podcast series brings together the natural and social sciences, policy making and artistic practice, to unpack the relationships between the natural world and the built world - and in doing so, consider the potential ways of inhabiting our urbanising planet in more ecologically just ways.

 

As a significant urban material, sand is taken as an entry point into the socio-natural worlds of the city. In this respect, the podcast series will examine the relationships between sand and city.

 

Sand and gravels constitute the largest volume of solid material extracted on the planet (UNEP, 2014). As the fabric of roads, buildings, fracking technologies, computer chips, glass and land itself, sand has been positioned as both the ‘unrecognised foundational material of our economies,’ and ‘one of the major sustainability challenges of the 21st century’ (UNEP, 2019: 2,9). Its extraction, transportation and consumption are reshaping the socio-natural geography of the earth in unprecedented ways, befitting of the widely circulating Anthropocene thesis – or the geological epoch of the Anthropos.

 

Estimates indicate we are consuming almost twice as much sand and gravel as a decade ago – a growing demand which is largely attributed to the expansion of cities (UNEP, 2014, 2019; Beiser, 2018) - for example, through concrete production or reclaimed land. Yet, the relationships between sand and city issues are not restricted to these facets. Rather, we can think about the ways in which cities negotiate their presence in sandy landscapes, such as coastlines, deltas and dunes. Thus, the relationships between urbanisation and sand are complex, multifaceted and political, and demand greater reflection.

In this vein, the podcast series brings together two significant processes of the global now - which often remain discussed in separate domains: 

​ 

SAND

landscapes/processes/movements/extraction/consumption

 

and 

 

URBAN

processes/materialities/landscapes/politics/life/labour

 

 

The podcast series will offer a critical space to think through questions of sand and city and invites conversations that consider the methodological, empirical, theoretical and policy implications of dialoguing in this way.

 

For instance: 

·       How are sand and urbanisation related?​

·       How does thinking with sand reshape our ideas of the city?

·       How does thinking with the city reshape our ideas of sand?

·       How, where and with what consequences is sand extracted?

·       What kinds of socio-natural politics surround sand and its urbanisation?

·       What kinds of urban labours are related to sand?

·       How does sand feature in urban life more broadly?

·       How do we methodologically engage with sand and its relationality to the city?

·       What are the processes of sand consumption in the city?

·       How is sand governed in and beyond the city?

·       How is sand imagined by those extracting and consuming?

·       What kinds of artistic practice might be able to capture these kinds of relationships?

·       How might we best manage the relationships between sand and urbanisation?

 

The series invites contributions from diverse geographical and disciplinary perspectives, including, but certainly not limited to, urban studies, postcolonial urbanism, urban political ecology (UPE), geopolitics, landscape geography, the environmental humanities, sustainability studies, environmental economics, geomorphological studies, pedology and coastal geography. The series also strongly welcomes policy makers, practitioners and artists.

 

For instance: 

  • How are sand and urbanisation related?​

  • How does thinking with sand reshape our ideas of the city?

  • How does thinking with the city reshape our ideas of sand?

  • How, where and with what consequences is sand extracted?

  • What kinds of socio-natural politics surround sand and its urbanisation?

  • What kinds of urban labours are related to sand?

  • How does sand feature in urban life more broadly?

  • How do we methodologically engage with sand and its relationality to the city?

  • What are the processes of sand consumption in the city?

  • How is sand governed in and beyond the city?

  • How is sand imagined by those extracting and consuming?

  • What kinds of artistic practice might be able to capture these kinds of relationships?

  • How might we best manage the relationships between sand and urbanisation?

 

The series invites contributions from diverse geographical and disciplinary perspectives, including, but certainly not limited to, urban studies, postcolonial urbanism, urban political ecology (UPE), geopolitics, landscape geography, the environmental humanities, sustainability studies, environmental economics, geomorphological studies, pedology and coastal geography. The series also strongly welcomes policy makers, practitioners and artists.

if you are interested in participating, please contact me at k.e.dawson@lse.ac.uk.